VK_KHR_shader_float16_int8 on Anvil

The last time I talked about my driver work was to announce the implementation of the shaderInt16 feature for the Anvil Vulkan driver back in May, and since then I have been working on VK_KHR_shader_float16_int8, a new Vulkan extension recently announced by the Khronos group, for which I have just posted initial patches in mesa-dev supporting Broadwell and later Intel platforms.

As you probably guessed by the name, this extension enables Vulkan to consume SPIR-V shaders that use of Float16 and Int8 types in arithmetic operations, extending the functionality included with VK_KHR_16bit_storage and VK_KHR_8bit_storage, which was limited to load/store operations. In theory, applications that do not need the range and precision of regular 32-bit floating point and integers, can use these new types to improve performance by increasing ALU throughput and reducing register pressure, which in some platforms can also lead to improved parallelism.

In the case of the Intel platforms initial testing done by Intel suggests that better ALU throughput is expected when issuing half-float instructions. Lower register pressure is also expected, at least for SIMD16 fragment and compute shaders, where we can pack all 16-channels worth of half-float data into a single GPU register, which could significantly improve performance for shaders that would otherwise need to spill registers to memory.

Another neat thing is that while VK_KHR_shader_float16_int8 is a Vulkan extension, its implementation is mostly API agnostic, so most of the work we did here should also help us have a proper mediump implementation for GLSL ES shaders in the future.

There are a few caveats to consider as well though: on some hardware platforms smaller bit-sizes have certain hardware restrictions that may lead to emitting worse shader code in some scenarios, and generally, Mesa’s compiler infrastructure (and the Intel compiler backend in particular) have a long history of being 32-bit only, so there are parts of the compiler stack that still work better for 32-bit code.

Because VK_KHR_shader_float16_int8 is a brand new feature, we don’t really have any real world use cases yet. This is on top of the fact that Mesa’s compiler backends have been mostly (or exclusively) 32-bit aware until now (and more recently 64-bit too), so going forward I would expect a lot of focus on making our compiler be as robust (and optimal) for 16-bit code as it is for 32-bit code.

While we are already aware of a few areas where we can do better and I am currently working on addressing a few of these, one of the major limiting factors we have at the moment is the fact that the only source of 16-bit shaders available to us is the Khronos CTS, which due to its particular motivation, is very different from real world shader workloads and it is not a valid source material to drive compiler optimization work. Unfortunately, it might take some time until we start seeing applications using these new features, so in the meantime we will need to find other ways to drive further work in this area, and I think our best option here might be GLSL ES’s mediump and lowp qualifiers.

GLSL ES mediump and lowp qualifiers have been around for a long time but they are only defined as hints to the shader compiler that lower precision is acceptable and we have never really used them to emit half-float code. Thankfully, Topi Pohjolainen from Intel has been working on this for a while, which would open up a much better scenario for improving our 16-bit compiler paths, so this is something I am really looking forward to.

Finally, as I say above, we could could definitely use more testing and feedback from real world use cases, so if you decide to use this feature in your next project and you hit any bugs, please be sure to file them in Bugzilla so we can continue to improve our implementation.

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