Web Engines Hackfest 2016

From September 26th to 28th we celebrated at the Igalia HQ the 2016 edition of the Web Engines Hackfest. This year we broke all records and got participants from the three main companies behind the three biggest open source web engines, say Mozilla, Google and Apple. Or course, it was not only them, we had some other companies and ourselves. I was active part of the organization and I think we not only did not get any complain but people were comfortable and happy around.

We had several talks (I included the slides and YouTube links):

We had lots and lots of interesting hacking and we also had several breakout sessions:

  • WebKitGTK+ / Epiphany
  • Servo
  • WPE / WebKit for Wayland
  • Layout Models (Grid, Flexbox)
  • WebRTC
  • JavaScript Engines
  • MathML
  • Graphics in WebKit

What I did during the hackfest was working with Enrique and Žan to advance on reviewing our downstream implementation of Media Source Extensions (MSE) in order to land it as soon as possible and I can proudly say that we did already (we didn’t finish at the hackfest but managed to do it after it). We broke the bots and pissed off Michael and Carlos but we managed to deactivate it by default and continue working on it upstream.

So summing up, from my point of view and it is not only because I was part of the organization at Igalia, based also in other people’s opinions, I think the hackfest was a success and I think we will continue as we were or maybe growing a bit (no spoilers!).

Finally I would like to thank our gold sponsors Collabora and Igalia and our silver sponsor Mozilla.

Web Engines Hackfest according to me

And once again, in December we celebrated the hackfest. This year happened between Dec 7-9 at the Igalia premises and the scope was much broader than WebKitGTK+, that’s why it was renamed as Web Engines Hackfest. We wanted to gather people working on all open source web engines and we succeeded as we had people working on WebKit, Chromium/Blink and Servo.

The edition before this I was working with Youenn Fablet (from Canon) on the Streams API implementation in WebKit and we spent our time on the same thing again. We have to say that things are much more mature now. During the hackfest we spent our time in fixing the JavaScriptCore built-ins inside WebCore and we advanced on the automatic importation of the specification web platform tests, which are based on our prior test implementation. Since now they are managed there, it does not make sense to maintain them inside WebKit too, we just import them. I must say that our implementation is fairly complete since we support the current version of the spec and have almost all tests passing, including ReadableStream, WritableStream and the built-in strategy classes. What is missing now is making Streams work together with other APIs, such as Media Source Extensions, Fetch or XMLHttpRequest.

There were some talks during the hackfest and we did not want to be less, so we had our own about Streams. You can enjoy it here:

You can see all hackfest talks in this YouTube playlist. The ones I liked most were the ones by Michael Catanzaro about HTTP security, which is always interesting given the current clumsy political movements against cryptography and the one by Dominik Röttsches about font rendering. It is really amazing what a browser has to do just to get some letters painted on the screen (and look good).

As usual, the environment was amazing and we had a great time, including the traditional Street Fighter‘s match, where Gustavo found a worthy challenger in Changseok 🙂

Of course, I would like to thank Collabora and Igalia for sponsoring the event!

And by the way, quite shortly after that, I became a WebKit reviewer!

WebKit Contributors Meeting 2015 (late, I know)

After writing my last post I realized that I needed to write a bit more about what I had been doing at the WebKit Contributors Meeting.

First thing to say is that it happened in March at Apple campus in Cupertino and I atteded as part of the Igalia gang.

My goal when I went there was to discuss with Youenn Fablet about Streams API and we are implementing and see how we could bootstrap the reviews and being to get the code reviewed and landed efficiently. Youenn and I also made a presentation (mainly him) about it. At that moment we got some comments and help from Benjamin Poulain and nowadays we are also working with Darin Adler and Geoffrey Garen so the work is ongoing.

WebRTC was also a hot topic and we talked a bit about how to deal with the promises as they seem to be involved in the WebRTC standard was well. My Igalian partner Philippe was missed in this regard as he is involved in the development of WebRTC in WebKit, but he unfortunately couldn’t make it because of personal reasons.

I also had an interesting talk with Jer Noble and Eric Carlson about Media Source and Encrypted Media Extensions. I told them about the several downstream implementations that we are or were working on, specially the WebKit4Wayland one and that we expect to begin to upstream soon. They commented that they still have doubts about the abstractions they made for them and of course I promised to get back to them when we begin with the job. Actually I already discussed some issues with Quique, another fellow Igalian.

Among the other interesting discussions, I found very necessary the migration of Mac port to CMake. Actually, I am experiencing now the painbenefits of using XCode to add files, specially the generated ones to the compilation. I hope that Alex succeeds with the task and soon we have a common build system for all main ports.

New media controls in WebKitGtk+ (reloaded)

In December we organized in A Coruña the WebKitGTK+ hackfest at the Igalia premises as usual and also as usual it was an awesome oportunity to meet the rest of the team. For more information about the progress done in the hackfest, you can have a look at KaL’s post.

As part of the hackfest I decided to take a task that it would take some time so that I could focus and I decided to go for rewriting once again the WebKitGTK+ multimedia controls. People who just read this post will wonder why I say again and the reason is that last year we completely redesigned the multimedia controls. This time I have not redesigned them (well, a bit) but rewritten them in JavaScript as the Apple guys had done before.

To get the job done, the first step was bundling the JavaScript code and activating the codepath to use those controls. I used the Apple controls as template so you can imagine that the first result was a non-working monster that at some point reminded to Safari multimedia controls. At that point I could do two things, forking or inheriting. I decided to go with inheritance because it keeps the spirit of WebKit (and almost all Free Software projects) of sharing as much code as possible and because forking later is easier than merging. Then step by step I kept redefining JavaScript methods and tweaking some stuff in the C++ and CSS code to create the current user experience that we had so far.

Some of the non-aesthetic changes are the following:

  • Focus rings are now managed from CSS instead of C++.
  • Tests got new fixes, rebaselines and more love.
  • CMake support for the new controls.
  • Load captions icon from theme.
  • Load and hide elements handled now with CSS (and JavaScript).

The captions icon problem was interesting because I found out that the one we were using was “user-invisible-symbolic” and it was hardcoded directly in the CSS code. I changed it to be loaded from the theme but it raised the issue of using the incorrect metaphor though the current icon looks nice for captions. I filed a GNOME bug (and another WebKit bug to follow this up) so that a new icon can be created for captions/subtitles with the correct metaphor.

And which are the controls aesthetic changes?

  • Show a very subtle gradient when the elements are focused or active to improve the accessibility support (which won’t be complete until bug 117857 is fixed).
  • Volume slider rolls up and down with a nice animation.
  • Some other elements are not shown when they are not needed.
  • Captions menu shows up with both click and mouse hover for coherence with the volume slider.
  • Captions menu is also animated the same way as the volume slider.
  • Captions menu was propertly centered.
  • Captions menu style was changed to make it more similar to the rest of the controls (fonts, margings…)
  • Volume slider shows below the media element when it is too close to the page top and it cannot be shown on it. This was a regression that I introduced with the first rewrite, happy to have it fixed now.

As I already said the aesthetic differences with the former C++ are not a big deal unless you compare them with the original controls:

Starting point

To appreciate the new controls I cannot just show a screenshot, because the nicest thing are the animations. Therefore a video is needed (and if you have WebKit compiled you can experience them yourself)):

Of course, I thank our hackfest sponsors as the it was possible because of them:

Igalia GNOME Foundation

New media controls in WebKitGtk+

So it looks like my patch for the rework of the WebKitGtk+ media controls was finally landed.

First I would like to thank Igalia for giving me some time to complete this task, which took some work and began at WebKitGtk+ hackfest some time ago with Žan Doberšek and Jon McCann.

Starting point was:

Starting point

As you can see the controls look like an old Gtk+ application without any theming. Jon suggested that we could began with mimicing Chromium controls as they look closer to any modern themed GNOME application and adapt them to use the GNOME symbolic icons and keep some other stuff like the volume bar, but of course making it look nicer.

What was done:

  • Adding the GNOME symbolic icon theme and a method to replace the normal stock icons, though we keep them as fallback.
  • Deep adaptation of Chromium CSS and C++ code to make it suit the GNOME requirements.
  • Some buttons fell off the design, like seeking backwards and forward.
  • Aligned the elements with the pixel ruler to make them as close to perfect as possible in all conditions (as some buttons are hidden in certain situations, like fullscreen, volume…).
  • Fixed a bug about the buffering ranges that was in trunk at that point, but was independent of the code I was cooking.
  • Removed as much of the C++ code as possible to deviate the drawing to CSS, which is more maintainable for design purposes. The only things that are still painted with C++ code are the slider tracks, which depend on parameters than cannot be specified in CSS, like the buffering ranges and the volume (which was not before, but I introduced for design coherence).
  • Removed the focus ring which was making the controls uglier.
  • Removed the dead code.
  • New baselines for the tests, including the pixel ones. Flagged also some tests that are (and will) not working in Chromium either.

I had a small issue with a Chromium guy landing a patch that forced me to change the display of some components from -webkit-box to -webkit-flex and of course, rebasing all related tests. This created a small delay in landing the patch, but it finally did as 143463.

And the result is the following:
New media controls

I don’t know about you guys, but I like it!