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Archive for the ‘Igalia’ Category

GTK+ 3 Plugins in WebKitGTK+ and Evince Browser Plugin

August 6th, 2014 7 comments

GTK+ 3 plugins in WebKitGTK+

The WebKit2 GTK+ API has always been GTK+ 3 only, but WebKitGTK+ still had a hard dependency on GTK+ 2 because of the plugin process. Some popular browser plugins like flash or Java use GTK+ 2 unconditionally (and it seems they are not going to be ported to GTK+ 3, at least not in the short term). These plugins stopped working in Epiphany when it switched to GTK+ 3 and started to work again when Epiphany moved to WebKit2.

To support GTK+ 2 plugins we had to build the plugin process with GTK+ 2, but also some parts of WebCore and WebKit2 (the ones depending on GTK+ and used by the plugin process) were built twice. As a result we had a WebKitPluginProcess binary of ~40MB, that was always used for all the plugins. This kind of made sense, since there were no plugins using GTK+ 3, and the GTK+ 2 dependency was harmless for plugins not using GTK+ at all. However, we realized we were making a rule for the exception, since most of the plugins don’t even use GTK+, and there weren’t plugins using GTK+ 3 because they were not supported by any browser (kind of chicken-egg problem).

Since WebKitGTK+ 2.5.1 we have two binaries for the plugin process: WebKitPluginProcess2 which is exactly the same 40MB binary using GTK+ 2 that we have always had, but that now is only used to load plugins using GTK+ 2; and WebKitPluginProcess, a 7,4K binary that is now used by default for everything except loading plugins that use GTK+ 2. And since it links to GTK+ 3, it might load plugins using GTK+ 3 as well. Another side effect is that now we can make GTK+ 2 optional, WebKitPluginProcess2 wouldn’t be built and only plugins using GTK+ 2 wouldn’t be supported.

Evince Browser Plugin

For a long time, we have maintained that PDF documents shouldn’t be opened inside the browser, but downloaded and then opened by the default document viewer. But then the GNOME design team came up with new mockups for Epiphany were everything was integrated in the browser, including PDF documents. It’s something all the major browsers do nowadays, using different approaches though (Custom PDF plugin inside the web engine, JavaScript libraries, etc.).

At the WebKitGTK+ hackfest in 2012 we started to think about how to implement the integrated document reading in Epiphany based on the design mockups. We quickly discarded the idea of implementing it as a NPAPI plugin, because that would mean we had to use a very old evince version using GTK+ 2. We can’t implement it inside WebKit using libevince because it’s a GPL library, so the first approach was to implement it inside Epiphany using libevince. I wrote a first patch, it was mostly a proof of concept hack, that added a new view widget based on EvView to be used instead of a WebView when a document supported by evince was requested. This approach has a lot of limitations, since it only works when the main resource is a document, but not for documents embedded in a HTML page or an iframe, and a lot of integration problems that makes it quite difficult to maintain inside Epiphany. All of these issues would be solved by implementing it as a NPAPI plugin and it wouldn’t require any change in Epiphany. Now that WebKitGTK+ supports GTK+ 3 plugins, there’s no reason not to do so.

Epiphany Evince Plugin

Thanks to a project in Igalia I’ve been able to work on it, and today I’ve landed an initial implementation of the browser plugin to Evince git master. It’s only a first implementation (written in C++ 11) with the basic features (page navigation, view modes, zoom and printing), and a very simple UI that needs to be updated to match the mockups. It can be disabled at compile time like all other frontends inside Evince (thumbnailer, previewer, nautilus properties page).

Epiphany embedded PDF document Epiphany standalone PDF document

Another advantage of being a NPAPI plugin is that it’s scriptable so that you can control the viewer using JavaScript.

Epiphany scriptable PDF

And you can pass initial parameters (like current page, zoom level, view mode, etc.) from the HTML tag.

<object data="test.pdf" type="application/pdf" width="600" height="300" 
                currentPage="2" zoomMode="fit-page" continuous="false">
  The pdf could not be rendered.
</object>

You can even hide the default toolbar and build your own one using HTML and JavaScript.

WebKitGTK+ 2.5.1: Good bye WebKit1

August 1st, 2014 1 comment

WebKitGTK+ 2.5.1 is the first version of this release cycle. It comes very late mainly due to the regressions introduced by the switch to CMake and the problems we found after removing WebKit1 from the tree. It also includes some new features that I’ll talk about in other posts, probably when 2.6.0 is released. In this post I’ll only focus on the breaks introduced in this release, in order to help everybody to adapt their applications to the API changes if needed.

Wait, but why breaking the API?

Since the release of WebKitGTK+ 2.0 the WebKit1 API has been considered deprecated and in maintenance mode. The new WebKit2 API is quite complete and stable now, so the plan for WebKitGTK+ 2.6 was removing WebKit1, leaving it alive, but still in maintenance mode, in the 2.4 branch. After removing the code from trunk we realized that newer versions of WebKitGTK+ that are WebKit2 only should be parallel installable with older versions of WebKitGTK+ that also include WebKit1. After some discussions trying to find the best solution, we reached the conclusion that we had to bump the binary version. But then I thought, since we were going to force everybody to recompile, why not take advantage to introduce some small (but necessary) API changes that in most of the cases will not affect the the users anyway? And then I started to review the API and proposing some changes. I also wanted to make sure all API changes were introduced in the first unstable release, so that users only have to adapt their applications once, and that’s the main reason why the release has taken so long.

Binary version bump

The new binary version is 4.0, so to use this new release you need to update your build system to look for webkit2gtk-4.0 pkg-config file.

GObject DOM Bindings

The GObject DOM bindings API situation was actually the main reason for breaking the API. The problem was that the code for the DOM bindings is generated automatically from the IDL files. This means that every time a new IDL file was added to the build system, we ended up exposing a new class in our public API without even noticing. Same happened when a API incompatible change was introduced in an IDL file, for example to update it to the current standard. We added a script to our build bots to warn us when that happened, and then we had to manually deprecate the existing API and add exceptions to the code generator. This was a lot of work just to keep backwards compatibility of an API nobody was using. Most of the people actually use a 5-10% of the DOM bindings API.

Since WebKitGTK+ 2.5.1 the GObject DOM bindings API is split into stable and unstable parts. The stable part contains the most commonly used API that it’s unlikely to change. We will keep maintaining backwards compatibility of this part of the API. The rest of the API is considered unstable and might change at any time, you can still use it but at your own risk. We thought this solution was better than just removing the unstable API. There are two kind of unstable APIs:

  • Classes that are considered unstable: the entire class is considered unstable. The header is not included in the main webkitdom.h header, so to use them you have to include the header file explicitly.
  • Unstable symbols of stable classes: a method or constant in a stable class that is considered unstable. In this case the header file is included by the main webkitfom.h header, but it doesn’t contain any unstable symbols, they are included in a new header WebKitDOMClassNameUnstable.h that also needs to be included explicitly.

In both cases you need to define WEBKIT_DOM_USE_UNSTABLE_API before including the headers

#define WEBKIT_DOM_USE_UNSTABLE_API
#include <webkitdom/WebKitDOMHTMLMediaElement.h>
#include <webkitdom/WebKitDOMElementUnstable.h>

WebKit2 GTK+ API

The API changes in the WebKit2 GTK+ API could have been avoided, by deprecating symbols and adding new ones, but since we were going to break the API anyway, and the affected symbols are not that commonly used we thought it was worth it.

  • WebKitWebView::create: the signal now receives a WebKitNavigationAction parameter containing information about the navigation action that triggered the event. So now you can know the type of event (if it was a link clicked, a form submitted, etc.), the mouse button and keyboard modifiers, the URI request or even if it was a user gesture. This information is very useful to implement a popup blocker, for example.
    /* before */
    static WebKitWebView *
    web_view_created_cb (WebKitWebView *web_view,
                         gpointer       user_data)
    
    /* after */
    static WebKitWebView *
    web_view_created_cb (WebKitWebView          *web_view,
                         WebKitNavigationAction *navigation_action,
                         gpointer                user_data)
  • WebKitWebViewGroup has been removed. This class was only introduced to add the user stylesheets API, since most of the people actually use the default web view group. The grouping of pages inside WebKit2 is something that will be eventually removed, in favor of users doing the groups they need. The user stylesheets API has been moved to a new class WebKitUserContentManager that will also be extended to support user scripts. The settings can still be handled directly with the WebKitWebView API, so that if you want a group of web views to share the same settings you can simply call webkit_web_view_set_settings() for all the web views passing the same WebKitSettings object.
    /* before */
    WebKitWebViewGroup *group = webkit_web_view_get_group (web_view);
    
    webkit_web_view_group_add_user_style_sheet (group, 
                                                buffer, 
                                                NULL, /* base URI */
                                                NULL, /* whitelist */
                                                NULL, /* blacklist */
                                                WEBKIT_INJECTED_CONTENT_FRAMES_ALL);
    
    /* after */
    WebKitUserContentManager *user_content;
    WebKitUserStyleSheet     *style_sheet;
    
    style_sheet = webkit_user_style_sheet_new (buffer,
                                               WEBKIT_USER_CONTENT_INJECT_ALL_FRAMES,
                                               WEBKIT_USER_STYLE_LEVEL_USER,
                                               NULL, /* whitelist */
                                               NULL /* blacklist */);
    user_content = webkit_web_view_get_user_content_manager (web_view);
    webkit_user_content_manager_add_style_sheet (user_content, style_sheet);
    webkit_user_style_sheet_unref (style_sheet);
  • WebKitCertificateInfo has been removed. This was supposed to be a convenient way of handling TLS certificates, but when trying to use it in a real case, it ended up being unconvenient. The WebKitWebView::load-failed-with-tls-errors signal now receives a GTlsCertificate and TlsCertificateFlags, and webkit_web_context_allow_tls_certificate_for_host() receives a GTlsCertificate.
    /* before */
    static gboolean
    load_failed_with_tls_errors_cb (WebKitWebView         *web_view,
                                    WebKitCertificateInfo *info,
                                    const gchar           *host,
                                    gpointer               user_data)
    {
      WebKitWebContext *context = webkit_web_view_get_context (web_view);
      GTlsCertificate *certificate = webkit_certificate_info_get_tls_certificate (info);
      GTlsCertificateFlags errors = webkit_certificate_info_get_tls_errors (info);
    
      if (add_exception_for_error (host, errors))
        webkit_web_context_allow_tls_certificate_for_host (context, info, host);
    }
    
    /* after */
    static gboolean
    load_failed_with_tls_errors_cb (WebKitWebView       *web_view,
                                    GTlsCertificate     *certificate,
                                    GTlsCertificateFlags errors,
                                    const gchar         *host,
                                    gpointer             user_data)
    {
      WebKitWebContext *context = webkit_web_view_get_context (web_view);
    
      if (add_exception_for_error (host, errors))
        webkit_web_context_allow_tls_certificate_for_host (context, certificate, host);
    }
  • View mode API: The view source mode was removed from WebCore, and the API was already marked as deprecated. Since it’s very unlikely we add more view modes, we just removed the API. There’s no replacement for this, but it could be easily implemented either using a external window with a GtkSourceView or embedded into a WebKitWebView by using a custom URI scheme and a JavaScript library for syntax highlighting.

CMake

Since version 2.5.1 WebKitGTK+ uses CMake instead autotools as its build system. The equivalent to configure, make and make install now would be something like this:

$ cd webkitgtk-2.5.1
$ cmake -DCMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX= -DCMAKE_INSTALL_LIBDIR=lib -DPORT=GTK \
-DCMAKE_BUILD_TYPE=Release .
$ make
(enjoy the summer in the meantime)
# make install

Help!

Sure, we are available as usual in the #webkitgtk+ IRC channel at FreeNode and our mailing list webkit-gtk@lists.webkit.org.

Categories: Free Software, GNOME, Igalia, WebKit Tags:

Evince Hackfest

The Evince hackfest took place last week from 23rd to 25th July in Strasbourg. Yes, 3 days only, but very productive in my opinion, I’ll summarize all the cool stuff we worked on.

HiDPI

This work was initially started by Owen, and then Germán kept the patches up to date with evince git master. I reviewed all the pending patches and updated the thumbnails one and the result is that evince doesn’t look blurry on HiDPI screens any more.

Evince running with GDK_SCALE=2

Evince running with GDK_SCALE=2

Recent View

This was a GSoC project of 2013, but the patch provided by the student was never in an “upstreamable” state. Again Germán, who always loved this feature, took care of the patch addressing my review comments. At the beginning of the hackfest most of the work has already been done, we only needed a few more review iterations during the hackfest to finally push this feature to master. The idea is to show the list of recent documents as an icon view with thumbnails and documents metadata. This view is loaded when evince is launched without any document replacing the useless empty window we had before. It also replaces the recent documents submenu in the gear menu.

Evince Recent View

UI improvements

The move to the header bar recently made the toolbar look a bit cluttered, mainly because the title might use a lot of space. We discussed several ideas to improve the header bar and implemented some of them:

Evince header bar improvements

 

Juanjo Marín also wrote a patch to change the default zoom mode to “Automatic”, since several people commented that the current “Fit Width” mode doesn’t look good in screens with higher resolutions. The patch is still waiting review.

Annotations

Giselle and Anuj, our GSoc students this year, worked on their projects to improve the annotations support in both Evince and poppler.

    • Anuj wrote some patches to add support for Free Text annotations to poppler glib API. After a couple of review iterations and discussions about the API, the patches are now in bugzilla waiting for a final review (I hope to find the time soon)
    • Giselle was focused on adding support for highlight annotations to Evince, since poppler already has all the required API for this. The patches are not yet ready, but they look really promising.

 

Caret navigation and accessibility

Joanie and API continued improving the evince a11y support and fixing some remaining issues from the FoG project. Antía fought with the caret navigation implementation again to implement some missing key bindings and fixing other issues.

Comics backend

Juanjo Marín focused on the comics backend, working on a patch to use libarchive to uncompress the documents instead of spawning external command line tools.

Gestures

I started to review the gestures branch during the hackfest, patches looked clean and simple, but since I was not familiarized with the new GTK+ touch API and I didn’t have a touch screen to try it out either, I decided to wait after the hackfest and see it in action in garnacho’s laptop during GUADEC. Carlos explained to me how the touch API works in GTK+ and I could check it actually works great. The code doesn’t affect the normal use with the mouse, so the branch will be merged in master soon.

Evince hackfest dinner

And of course not everything was hacking

THANKS!

Many thanks to Alexandre Franke for the local organization, everything worked perfectly. Of course thanks to the GNOME Foundation for sponsoring the GSoC students, Giselle and Anuj, and Igalia for sponsoring all the Igalians attending the hackfest. Thanks also to Epitech for allowing us to do the hackfest there before the GUADEC.

Igalia S.L. GNOME FoundationEPITECH

Categories: Free Software, GNOME, Igalia Tags: , ,

WebKitGTK+ 2.4.0: the multiprocess made easy

Yes, we did it again, we have just released WebKitGTK+ 2.4.0, another major stable release with a lot of bug fixes, some new features and more complete API.

Multiple Web Processes

This is the most important new feature included in this release, and the one we have spent most of the release cycle with. All started during the WebKitGTK+ hackfest when a team of around 10 people worked together to implement the base of the multi-process support. And at the very end of the release cycle we have been able to turn it on by default in Epiphany.

DOM touch events support

WebKitWebView now processes the touch events happening in the widget to notify the DOM, making modern websites using DOM touch API properly work. Carlos Garnacho has taken a screencast to show it in action

Plugins cache

When the first page containing plugins was loaded, the UI process got blocked for some time, while the plugins were scanned. This was one of the most annoying bugs of WebKitGTK+ introduced in 2.0. Plugins are synchronously scanned on demand during the page load, and it’s something that can’t be avoided. WebKitGTK+ 2.4 uses a persistent cache to store information about all plugins, so that plugins are only scanned the first time or when they change.

New API

As always a huge thanks to all the contributors that make this possible, and very specially in this release to the sponsors of the WebKitGTK+ hackfest 2013 (Igalia and the GNOME Foundation).

WebKit1 deprecation

There’s one last thing I would like to mention. Even when WebKit1 API has been deprecated since we released WebKitGTK+ 2.0, we have kept shipping both APIs in our tarball releases. A decision hasn’t been made yet, but this is probably the last release including the WebKit1 API, we have plans to remove the WebKit1 code from trunk and move all the build bots to run only WebKit2 tests. We encourage everybody to port their applications to WebKit2, submitting bug reports if there’s anything preventing the switch, and of course we are happy to help on IRC, mailing list, etc.

Categories: Free Software, GNOME, Igalia, WebKit Tags:

WebKitGTK+ Hackfest 2013: The Network Process

December 12th, 2013 2 comments

As every year many ideas came up during the WebKitGTK+ hackfest presentation, but this time there was one we all were very excited about, the multiple web processes support. Apple developers already implemented the support for multiple web processes in WebKit, which is mostly cross platform, but it requires the network process support to properly work (we need a common network process where cookies, HTTP cache, etc are shared for all web processes in the same web context). Soup based WebKit ports don’t implement the network process yet, so the goal of the hackfest became to complete the network process implementation previously started by EFL and Nix guys, as a first step to enable the multiple web processes support. Around 10 people were working on this goal during the whole hackfest, meeting from time to time to track the status of the tasks and assigning new ones.

After all this awesome work we managed to have the basic support, with MiniBrowser perfectly rendering pages and allowing navigation using the network process. But as expected, there were some bugs and missing features, so I ran the WebKit2 unit tests and we took failing tests to investigate why they were failing and how to fix them.

So, we are actually far from having a complete and stable network process support, but it’s a huge step forward. The good news is that once we have network process implemented, the multiple web processes support will work automatically just by selecting the multiple web process model.

All this sounds like a lot of work done, but that’s only a small part of what has happened this week in Coruña:

  • Martin and Gustavo made more parts of WebKit actually build with the cmake build.
  • Jon made several improvements in Epiphany UI.
  • Gustavo fixed the default charset encoding used by Epiphany.
  • Iago, Edu made some progress in the wayland support for WebKit2.
  • Dan was working on HTTP2 implementation for libsoup.
  • Zan was finalizing his GSoC work under Martin’s mentorship to bring WebGL support under Wayland
  • Gustavo added support for right-side docking of the web inspector in WebKitGTK+.
  • Javi, Rego and Minhea were focused on a new implementation for the selections in CSS regions.
  • Calvaris began to rewrite the GTK media controls once more, this time in JavaScript.
  • Zan finished the patches to add battery support in WebKitGTK+ using upower.
  • Martin, Gustavo and Zan worked on support for testing WebGL and accelerated compositing layout tests in WebKitGTK+.
  • Brian, Alex and Zan were working on the parsing of the valgrind xml output used when running the tests under valgrind to detect memory leaks.
  • Brendan added a setting to both WebKit1 and WebKit2 APIs to enable media source and fixed a crash in several video layout tests.
  • Claudio went back to his work on the notifications support for WebKitGTK+ and was reviewing patches like crazy.
  • Philippe worked on the WebRTC implementation for the GStreamer WebKit media backend.
  • Mario, Joanie and API were focused on accessibility, also making sure that the multiple web processes doesn’t affect the accessibility support.
  • Brendan also worked on MediaSource, investigating how to handle video resolution changes.
  • I removed all the WebKit1 unused code from Epiphany, and moved the GNOME shell search provider to its own binary.

And I’m sure I’m missing more great stuff done that I could not follow closely. It’s definitely been a very productive hackfest that it would haven’t been possible without the sponsors, Igalia and the GNOME Foundation. Thanks!

Igalia S.L. GNOME Foundation

WebKitGTK+ 2.2.0: It shines and doesn’t blink

September 27th, 2013 11 comments

With a bit of delay but we have finally released a new stable version of WebKitGTK+. This is the first stable release after the major 2.0 release. It mainly contains a lot of bug fixes and a few important new futures and API additions.

New Web Inspector

WebKitGTK+ now uses the new Web Inspector recently opensourced and upstreamed by Apple. We took advantage of the migration to improve the way inspector resources are distributed by compiling them in the WebKitGTK+ library as GResources. This means that resources are now always available without having to run make install or set environment variables.

WebKitGTK+ new Web Inspector

Initial Wayland support

WebKitGTK+ 2.2 can be built with Wayland target if it’s available (it requires GTK+ 3.10 compiled with Wayland support). Not everything is fully supported yet, but the WebKit layout tests can be run under the Weston compositor and WebGL content works under Wayland displays too. There’s more detailed information in Žan Doberšek’s blog.

Video accelerated compositing support

When accelerated compositing is enabled, the GStreamer media player can play videos using OpenGL. You can find more details in Víctor’s blog.

Custom JavaScript injection

This was one of the major regressions in WebKit2GTK+ compared to the WebKit1 API. WebKitGTK+ 2.2 now allows to inject custom JavaScript code using the JavaScriptCore C API from a WebKit Web Process Extension. New API has been added to also allow running specific JavaScript code in isolated worlds. You can find examples about how to use this API and how to write Web Process Extensions in general in this post.

Improved accessibility support in WebKit2

Accessibility support in WebKit2 has been reworked to not depend on pango and gail, which resulted in several bugs fixed and a much better accessibility support. Check Mario’s blog for all the details.

New API

Categories: Free Software, Igalia, WebKit Tags:

WebKit2GTK+ Web Process Extensions

September 10th, 2013 3 comments

The multiprocess architecture of WebKit2 brought us a lot of advantages, but it also introduced important challenges, like how to expose some features that now live in the Web Process (DOM, JavaScript, etc.). The UI process API is fully asynchronous to make sure the UI is never blocked, but some APIs like the DOM bindings are synchronous by design. To expose those features that live in the Web Process, WebKit2GTK+ provides a Web Extensions mechanism. A Web Extension is like a plugin for the Web Process, that is loaded at start up, similar to a GTK module or gio extension, but that runs in the Web Process. WebKit2GTK+ exposes a simple low level API that at the moment provides access to three main features:

  • GObject DOM bindings: The exactly same API used in WebKit1 is available in WebKit2.
  • WebKitWebPage::send-request signal: It allows to change any request before it is sent to the server, or even simply prevent it from being sent.
  • Custom JavaScript injection: It provides a signal, equivalent to WebKitWebView::window-object-cleared in WebKit1, to inject custom JavaScript using the JavaScriptCore API. (Since 2.2)

This simple API doesn’t provide any way of communication with the UI Process, so that the user can use any IPC mechanism without interfering with the internal WebKit IPC traffic. Epiphany currently installs a Web Extension to implement some of its features such us pre-filled forms, ads blocker or Do Not Track using D-BUS for the communication between the Web Extension and the UI Process.

How to write a Web Extension?

Web Extensions are shared libraries loaded at run time by the Web Process, so they don’t have a main function, but they have an entry point called by the WebProcess right after the extension is loaded. The initialization function must be called webkit_web_extension_initialize() and it receives a WebKitWebExtension object as parameter. It should also be public, so make sure to use the G_MODULE_EXPORT macro. This is the function to initialize the Web Extension and can be used, for example, to be notified when a web page is created.

static void
web_page_created_callback (WebKitWebExtension *extension,
                           WebKitWebPage      *web_page,
                           gpointer            user_data)
{
    g_print ("Page %d created for %s\n", 
             webkit_web_page_get_id (web_page),
             webkit_web_page_get_uri (web_page));
}

G_MODULE_EXPORT void
webkit_web_extension_initialize (WebKitWebExtension *extension)
{
    g_signal_connect (extension, "page-created", 
                      G_CALLBACK (web_page_created_callback), 
                      NULL);
}

This would be a minimal Web Extension, it does nothing yet, but it can be compiled and loaded so let’s see how to create a Makefile.am file to build the extension.

webextension_LTLIBRARIES = libmyappwebextension.la
webextensiondir = $(libdir)/MyApp/web-extension
libmyappwebextension_la_SOURCES = my-app-web-extension.c
libmyappwebextension_la_CFLAGS = $(WEB_EXTENSION_CFLAGS)
libmyappwebextension_la_LIBADD = $(WEB_EXTENSION_LIBS)
libmyappwebextension_la_LDFLAGS = -module -avoid-version -no-undefined

The extension will be installed in $(libdir)/MyApp/web-extension so we need to tell WebKit where to find web extensions before the Web Process is spawned. Call webkit_web_context_set_web_extensions_directory() as soon as possible in your application, before any other WebKit call to make sure it’s called before a Web Process is launched. You can create a preprocessor macro in the Makefile.am to pass the value of the Web Extensions directory.

myapp_CPPFLAGS = -DMYAPP_WEB_EXTENSIONS_DIR=\""$(libdir)/MyApp/web-extension"\"

And then in the code

webkit_web_context_set_web_extensions_directory (webkit_web_context_get_default (), 
                                                 MYAPP_WEB_EXTENSIONS_DIR);

The Web Extension only needs WebKit2GTK+ to build, so in the configure.ac you can define WEB_EXTENSION_CFLAGS and WEB_EXTENSION_LIBS using pkg-config macros.

PKG_CHECK_MODULES(WEB_EXTENSION, [webkit2gtk-3.0 >= 2.0.0])
AC_SUBST(WEB_EXTENSION_CFLAGS)
AC_SUBST(WEB_EXTENSION_LIBS)

This should be enough. You should be able to build and install the Web Extension with you program and see the printf message every time a page is created. But that’s a useless example, let’s see how to use the Web Extensions API to do something useful.

Accessing the DOM

The GObject DOM bindings API available in WebKit1 is also exposed in WebKit2 from the Web Extensions API. We only need to call webkit_web_page_get_dom_document() to get the WebKitDOMDocument of the given web page.

static void
web_page_created_callback (WebKitWebExtension *extension,
                           WebKitWebPage      *web_page,
                           gpointer            user_data)
{
    WebKitDOMDocument *document;
    gchar             *title;

    document = webkit_web_page_get_dom_document (web_page);
    title = webkit_dom_document_get_title (document);
    g_print ("Page %d created for %s with title %s\n", 
             webkit_web_page_get_id (web_page),
             webkit_web_page_get_uri (web_page),
             title);
    g_free (title);
}

Using WebKitWebPage::send-request signal

Using the Web Extensions API it’s possible to modify the request of any resource before it’s sent to the server, adding HTTP headers or modifying the URI. You can also make WebKit ignore a request, for example to block resources depending on the URI, by simply connecting to the signal and returning TRUE.

static gboolean
web_page_send_request (WebKitWebPage     *web_page,
                       WebKitURIRequest  *request,
                       WebKitURIResponse *redirected_response,
                       gpointer           user_data)
{
    const char *request_uri;
    const char *page_uri;

    request_uri = webkit_uri_request_get_uri (request);
    page_uri = webkit_web_page_get_uri (web_page);

    return uri_is_an_advertisement (request_uri, page_uri);
}

static void
web_page_created_callback (WebKitWebExtension *extension,
                           WebKitWebPage      *web_page,
                           gpointer            user_data)
{
    g_signal_connect_object (web_page, "send-request",
                             G_CALLBACK (web_page_send_request),
                             NULL, 0);
}

Extending JavaScript

Using the JavaScriptCore API it’s possible to inject custom JavaScript code by connecting to the window-object-cleared signal of the default WebKitScriptWorld. You can get the global JavaScript execution context by calling webkit_frame_get_javascript_context_for_script_world() for the WebKitFrame passed as parameter of the window-object-cleared signal.

static void 
window_object_cleared_callback (WebKitScriptWorld *world, 
                                WebKitWebPage     *web_page, 
                                WebKitFrame       *frame, 
                                gpointer           user_data)
{
    JSGlobalContextRef jsContext;
    JSObjectRef        globalObject;

    jsContext = webkit_frame_get_javascript_context_for_script_world (frame, world);
    globalObject = JSContextGetGlobalObject (jsContext);

    /* Use JSC API to add the JavaScript code you want */
}

G_MODULE_EXPORT void
webkit_web_extension_initialize (WebKitWebExtension *extension)
{
    g_signal_connect (webkit_script_world_get_default (), 
                      "window-object-cleared", 
                      G_CALLBACK (window_object_cleared_callback), 
                      NULL);
}

WebKitGTK+ 2.0.0

April 11th, 2013 9 comments

After more than two years of development the Igalia WebKit team is proud to announce WebKitGTK+ 2.0.0.

But what’s so special about WebKitGTK+ 2.0?

The WebKit2GTK+ API is now the default one. This means that it’s now considered stable from the API/ABI backwards compatibility point of view, and that the old WebKit1 API is in maintenance mode and kind of deprecated. We will maintain both APIs, but we don’t plan to work on WebKi1 other than fixing bugs.

We encourage everybody to port their existing WebKitGTK+ applications to WebKit2, although we know the WebKit2 GTK+ API is not ready for all applications yet. We will work on adding new API during next release cycle, so let us know if you are missing some API that prevents you from porting your project.

Epiphany, the GNOME Web browser, has been successfully ported to WebKit2 and uses it by default since GNOME 3.8.

What are the benefits of the WebKit2 GTK+ API?

We have talked several times about the advantages of the multi-process architecture of WebKit2, robustness, responsiveness, security, etc. All of the details of the multi-process separation are mostly transparent for the API users, bringing all those benefits for free to any application using WebKit2 GTK+. We have developed the API on top of this multi-process architecture, but also with the experience of several years developing and maintaining the WebKit1 GTK+ API, learning from the mistakes made in the past and keeping the good ideas. As a result, the WebKit2 API is very similar to the WebKi1 in some parts and quite different in others. We started from scratch with the following goals:

  • Simple and easy to use. Instead of porting the WebKit1 API to WebKit2, we decided to add new API on demand. We set some milestones based on porting real applications, adding new API required to port them. This also allowed us to design the API, not only thinking about what we want or need to expose, but also how the applications expect to use the API.
  • Consistency. We have tried hard to be consistent with the names of the functions, signals and properties exposed by the API.
  • Flexibility. When possible, the API allows to use your own implementation of some parts that can be adopted to different platforms. So, you can use your own file chooser, JavaScript dialogs, context menu, print dialog, etc.
  • It works by default. For all those features where a custom implementation can be used, there’s a default implementation in WebKit that just works by default.
  • Unit tests. We have enforced all new patches adding API to WebKit2 GTK+ to include also unit tests, so the whole API is covered by unit tests.

Let’s see the major changes and advantages of this new WebKi2 API.

WebKitWebView is a scrolling widget

For API users this means that WebKitWebView should not be added to a GtkScrolledWindow, the widget is scrollable by itself. Actually this is also the case of the WebKitWebView in WebKit1, but some hacks were introduced to allow the widget to be used inside a GtkScrolledWindow. This caused a lot of headaches due to the synchronization between the internal scrolling and the GTK+ scroll adjustments. So now the main scrollbars are also handled by the WebKitWebView which, among other things, fixed the problem of the double scrollbars in some web sites.

Double scrollbar issue

Embedded HTTP authentication dialog

The default implementation of the HTTP authentication embeds a dialog in the WebView instead of using a real GtkDialog. It’s also integrated with the keyring by default using libsecret.

HTTP authentication dialog

GTK+ 2 plugins (flash)

Plugins also run in a different process that is built with GTK+ 2 to support the most popular plugins like flash that still use GTK+ 2.

MiniBrowser showing a youtube video using flash plugin

Web Inspector

The Web Inspector works automatically in both docked and undocked states without requiring any API call.

Inspector docked

It also has support for remote inspecting.

Remote inspecting

Accelerated compositing

Accelerated compositing is always enabled in WebKit2.

Poster circle

Future plans

During the next release cycle we’ll work on fixing bugs and completing the API, see our RoadMap for further details, but we’ll also explore some other areas not directly related the the API:

  • Multiple web processes support
  • Sandboxing
  • Network Process
Categories: Free Software, Igalia, WebKit Tags: ,

WebKitGTK+ Hackfest 2012

December 26th, 2012 6 comments

This year again the WebKitGTK+ hackfest took place at the Igalia office in A Coruña, and this year again it’s been awesome.

My main goal for the hackfest was to implement an extension system for the web process in WebKit2, that would allow, among other things, to access the DOM, which is the major regression of the WebKit2 GTK+ API. The idea was to use the exactly same GObject DOM bindings API we are currently using in WebKit1, so I moved it to a convenient static library and installed the public headers in its own directory making it shareable between WebKit1 and WebKit2. Once GObject DOM bindings were accessible from WebKit2 I wrote a first patch to implement the web extension system providing a new API for extensions to access the DOM.

I also took advantage of the hackfest time, to re-take a task I had pending for some time, adding an API to WebKit2 to handle SSL errors. I didn’t have time to finish the API, but managed to write a first patch to set a policy for SSL errors. For now it only allows to ignore SSL errors and continue the load or make the load fail in case of SSL errors. The idea is to add a new policy to ask the user what to do.

Even though it was not part of my initial plans for the hackfest I ended up working on the document reading integration in Epiphany. I wrote an initial patch for Epiphany to load documents supported by Evince embedded in the window like a web view. There are still a lot of features to integrate like zooming, searching, printing, etc.

Epiphany showing a PDF document

I set a milestone to switch Epiphany to WebKit2 by default at the end of the hackfest, but I didn’t have time to fix all the regressions. We are a lot closer, though.

This event is impossible without the sponsors, thanks!

 

SSL certificates information support in Epiphany

August 9th, 2012 7 comments

Since the Epiphany migration to WebKit, websites with an invalid SSL certificate were marked as untrusted with the unsecure lock icon in the location bar. However, it wasn’t possible to know what was wrong with the certificate nor the certificate details. Using the certificate viewer widget available in gcr, I’ve implemented a dialog to show information about the possible SSL errors and certificate details in Epiphany. This also means Epiphany now depends on gcr.

Epiphany showing an invalid certificate

Epiphany showing an invalid certificate

Categories: Free Software, GNOME, Igalia Tags: